Resources

As with most wellness efforts, getting started can be the hardest step.

The 2016 61-Day Challenge begins November 1, 2016. Over the next two months, you will be challenged to live a healthier lifestyle. This year’s added challenge is to Eat More Fruit. In the tradition of building on past years’ components, you will be living the challenge by:

For Our Partner Businesses

We know that many of our Partners have developed a wide range of messaging and activities to help their employees live the 61-Day Challenge, and we ask you to share your efforts with us so that we can share ideas on this page. The Detroit Medical Center can assist you by offering educational sessions or additional information on a wide variety of health topics including:

  • Nutrition
  • Exercise
  • Diabetes
  • Heart Health
  • Exercise Options

For additional information and/or to schedule a lunch and learn educational session, please contact Tonita Cheatham at (313) 966-4012.

Employee Messaging - Living the 61-Day Challenge

The following messages are offered for your use in communicating with your employees, friends or family members. You decide which messages to use knowing you can edit to match your audiences. Our goal is to make the challenge easy for everyone.

Living the 2015 61-Day Challenge!

SAMPLE Pre-Kick Off (messages for use prior to October 30)

Our employees are gearing up to live the 61-Day Challenge scheduled to begin November 1, 2015. This annual event, for 61- days, focuses on healthy lifestyle management which includes fitness, nutrition, health education and dedication. You are invited to join the 2015 61-Day Challenge. This year’s kick-off event will be held at Detroit Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital of Michigan Auditorium on October 30 at 10 a.m. Pledge to live the 61-Day Challenge and join thousands of Southeast Michigan residents in creating healthier communities. To learn more, visit www.dmc.org/pledge.

Kick-Off Day

SAMPLE Message

It’s finally here. The 2015 61-Day Challenge begins November 1, 2015. Over the next two months, you will be challenged to live a healthier lifestyle. This year’s added challenge is to Eat More Fruit. In the tradition of building on past years’ components, you will be living the challenge by:

To help you live the 61-Day Challenge, a Resource page is available to help you understand the nsert risks associated with high calorie foods and low levels of physical activity. Visit the Resources page by visiting the DMC 61-Day Challenge Resources.

6-Days of Tips on How to Live the 61-Day Challenge!

DAY ONEDAY TWODAY THREEDAY FOURDAY FIVEDAY SIX

 


DAY ONE

Today is day one of the 2015 61-Day Challenge. Each day we will provide information to help you Live the 61-Day Challenge. This is a voluntary health education program that includes elements of fitness, nutrition, health education and commitment.

 A reminder: 61-Day Challenge participants are challenged to:

Each challenge participant is also encouraged to educate at least one other person on how to live a healthier lifestyle during the 61 days.

Suggestion: Identify a friend or family member to the challenge and share the experience with you.

Tip: Set some goals (example: replace soda and sugary drinks with water or unsweetened substitutions; identify a walking routine; plan the week’s grocery menu to avoid buying foods you are challenged to avoid or reduce, etc.)

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DAY TWO

EAT MORE FRUIT - Face it, as Americans we just aren’t eating enough fruits. Fruits and vegetables are the foundation of a healthy diet and are rich in vitamins, nutrients, antioxidants, fiber and water. But the hard facts tell us that less than 30% of us – that’s seven out of every ten Americans – are eating the recommended 5-A-Day servings.

 This isn’t a food revolution. Just a few small and very simple changes to help you eat healthier and feel better. Step one: Eat more Fruits. How often do you get told to eat more of something? Choose fresh fruits over candy and tackle the Eat More Fruits and Eat Less Sugar challenges in one easy step!

FRUIT FACTS:

Face it, as Americans we just aren’t eating enough fruits. Fruits and vegetables are the foundation of a healthy diet and are rich in vitamins, nutrients, antioxidants, fiber and water. But the hard facts tell us that less than 30% of us – that’s seven out of every ten Americans – are eating the recommended 5-A-Day servings. This isn’t a food revolution. Just a few small and very simple changes to help you eat healthier and feel better. Step one: Eat more Fruits. How often do you get told to eat more of something? Choose fresh fruits over candy and tackle the Eat More Fruits and Eat Less Sugar challenges in one easy step!

  • The fiber in fruits and vegetables is important and studies have found that a diet rich in fiber-containing foods may reduce the risk of heart disease. Fruits and vegetables are also rich in nutrients, such as vitamins A and C, folate, and potassium.

Helpful Tips!

  • When shopping for fruits and vegetables, choose an assortment of different types and colors to provide you with a variety of nutrients.
  • Sources of vitamin A (carotenoids) ◦Bright orange vegetables like carrots, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin
    • Tomatoes and tomato products (sauce, paste, and puree), and red sweet pepper
    • Leafy greens such as spinach, collards, turnip greens, kale, beet and mustard greens, green leaf lettuce, and romaine lettuce
    • Orange fruits like mango, cantaloupe, apricots, and red or pink grapefruit
  • Sources of vitamin C
    • Citrus fruits and juices, kiwi, strawberries, guava, papaya, and cantaloupe
    • Broccoli, peppers, tomatoes, cabbage (especially Chinese cabbage), brussels sprouts, and potatoes
    • Leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, turnip greens, and spinach
  • Sources of folate
    • Cooked dry beans and peas
    • Oranges and orange juice
    • Deep green leaves like spinach and mustard greens
  • Sources of potassium
    • Baked white or sweet potatoes, cooked greens (such as spinach), and winter (orange) squash
    • Bananas, plantains, many dried fruits, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, and honeydew melons
    • Cooked dry beans
    • Soybeans (green and mature)
    • Tomato products
    • Beet greens
  • One caution about buying packaged (canned, dried, or frozen) fruits and vegetables is they may contain added sugars, saturated fats, or sodium—ingredients you many need to limit. Added sugars can appear on the ingredient list as brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert corn syrup, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, molasses, maple syrup, raw sugar, sucrose, and syrup.
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DAY THREE

AVOID SODA POP (and other sugary drinks) - A High consumption of soda has been linked with numerous health problems, including weight gain, poor dental health, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In turn, these can lead to heart attacks, stroke and even premature death.

SODA Facts:

  • The average American consumes 45 gallons of sugary, sweetened beverages per year, according to a 2011 study by Yale University.
  • There is zero nutritional value in soda.
  • The three main ingredients in a 12-ounce can of soda include 41 grams of sugar, 30 milligrams of sodium and 38 milligrams of caffeine. The latter two ingredients can do the most damage to the heart
Helpful Tips!
  • Instead of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, try a diet soda or water or at least reduce the amount of regular soft drinks you consume.
  • Choose water or unsweetened iced tea to stay hydrated and avoid the sugar let down.
  • If you need caffeine, brew some tea and add oranges and lemons for flavor, instead of sugar.
  • Keep a pitcher of water flavored with orange, lemon, lime, or cucumber slices in the fridge for quick, flavorful hydration.
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DAY FOUR

AVOID FRIED FOODS - Fried food is hard to avoid – but you can do it, and there are plenty of reasons why you should.

FRIED FOOD FACTS:

  • Fried food clogs the arteries leading to an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and kidney failure.
  • It’s not just the fat in fried foods that’s harming you. When cooking oil is heated to frying temperatures, it forms cancer-causing chemicals that are released into your food.
  • Fried food increases your risk of breast, lung, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. New scientific research shows that eating fried food also increases the risk of prostate cancer in men.
  • Eating fried food can increase the acid production in your stomach causing acid reflux – chronic heartburn.
  • Fried food is a huge source of saturated fats and trans fats, which are dangerous because they raise bad cholesterol (LDL) and lower good cholesterol (HDL).

Helpful Tips!

  • A little oil goes a long way – add a small amount of oil to meats and/or vegetables and brown them in the oven instead of frying.
  • Add moisture – marinating meats before oven-frying helps keep the meat from drying out while baking.
  • Make a crispy crust – Adding crispy ingredients, such as panko bread crumbs or corn flakes, to the outside of the food and bake for a crispy texture.
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DAY FIVE

EAT LESS SUGAR- Americans eat sugars in many forms. Sugars are used as natural preservatives, thickeners, and baking aids in foods and are often added to foods during processing and preparation or when they are eaten.

SUGAR FACTS:

  • The average American consumes over 22 teaspoons (352 calories) of added sugar every day. The average American should be consuming less than 6 teaspoons of added sugar per day.
  • Sugar can negatively impact how children learn.
  • Foods with added sugars are often high in calories and low in nutrition.
  • Sugar is linked to high blood pressure.
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup is linked to Type II Diabetes and Obesity.

Helpful Tips!

  • Eat whole fruit instead of fruit juices- even 100% fruit juice is high in natural sugar.
  • Consider sweetened drinks (ie. lemonade, fruit punch) as liquid candy.
  • Don't skip meals- this may cause a sugar craving.
  • Don't add sugar to foods.
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DAY SIX

WALK MORE STEPS - Increase physical activity

 Americans working full time spend more than one-third of their day, five days per week at the workplace, and 83% of the workforce spends that time in a sedentary job.

TIPS FOR GETTING IN MORE STEPS:-

  • Exercise at a moderate pace for at least 30 minutes several times a week.
  • Schedule regular exercise dates – plan regular workouts with an exercise partner. Exercise seems to go by faster when you are distracted by conversation. You’re also less likely to skip.
  • Set goals and stick to them (time, distance, frequency, etc.)
  • Switch up your exercise routines (walk outdoors, walk on treadmill or other walking machine, walk up and down stairs or even create a run, jog, walk routine, maybe even train for a 5K.
  • Park farther away from the entrance to any buildings you visit (safety first).
  • Walk during work breaks – time away from your workspace can do wonders for concentration afterwards.
  • Don’t overdo it.
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