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Pregnancy & H1N1 Facts for Healthcare Workers


December 3, 2013- DMC Children’s Hospital of Michigan and DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital Awarded Coveted 2013 Leapfrog Top Hospital Distinction

The Leapfrog Group has named the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Children’s Hospital of Michigan and DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital to its annual list of Top Hospitals, a gold standard in measuring hospital performance with quality and safety. The announcement came at Leapfrog’s Annual Meeting on December 3 in Arlington, Va., which gathered key decision-makers from Leapfrog's network of purchaser members, industry partners, health care stakeholders and national collaborators.

“Every year our hospitals are recognized as leaders in the industry, we are thankful for our DMC staff and physicians who maintain our focus on quality and safety for our patients,” said DMC CEO Joe Mullany. “Both Children’s Hospital of Michigan and DMC Detroit Receiving are well regarded for their pediatric, and adult specialty and trauma care, and patients travel from throughout the region and state for the specialized services offered at both of these remarkable hospitals.”

“The field of hospitals’ considered for this year’s elite Leapfrog Top Hospital distinction was more competitive than ever.  By achieving the Top Hospital accolade, DMC has demonstrated exemplary performance across all areas of quality and patient safety that are analyzed on the Leapfrog Hospital Survey. If my family or friends needed care, I’d be comfortable sending them to DMC,” said Leah Binder, President & CEO of The Leapfrog Group.

DMC Children’s Hospital of Michigan and DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital were selected as Top Hospitals out of a record number of 1,324 hospitals participating in The Leapfrog Group’s annual survey. The list includes 22 Top Rural Hospitals, 55 Top Urban Hospitals and 13 Top Children’s Hospitals. Hospitals reaching this achievement include academic medical centers, teaching hospitals, children’s hospitals, and community hospitals in rural, suburban and urban settings.  The selection is based on the results of the Leapfrog Group’s annual hospital survey, which measures hospitals’ performance on patient safety and quality, focusing on three critical areas of hospital care: how patients fare, resource use, and management structures in place to prevent errors.  The results of the survey are posted on a website (http://www.leapfroggroup.org/cp) open to patients and families, the public, employers and other purchasers of health care.

Established in 1886, the Children's Hospital of Michigan is the first and most experienced hospital in the state dedicated exclusively to the treatment of children. A leader internationally in neurology and neurosurgery, cardiology, oncology, pediatric burn and trauma, and diagnostic services, it is ranked one of America's best hospitals for children. More Michigan pediatricians are trained at the Children's Hospital of Michigan than in any other facility.

DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital offers expertise in complex trauma, critical care, orthopedics, urology, neurosciences, geriatrics, urology, pulmonology and stroke, and is an ABA verified burn center, one of only 43 in the country. DMC Detroit Receiving is Michigan’s first Level I Trauma Center and its leading 24/7 hyperbaric oxygen therapy program. Detroit Receiving achieved Magnet status in 2009; only 7% of this nation’s hospitals are so designated for nursing excellence, nursing leadership, research and community outreach. 


WHAT IS H1N1 INFLUENZA?
H1N1 influenza is a respiratory disease that is caused by a type A influenza virus. The current H1N1 virus contains unique genes from pig and human influenza viruses and hence is called the “Novel H1N1 Influenza Virus”. This strain of flu germ spreads from human to human and can cause illness.



Does H1N1 INFLUENZA pose special risks for pregnant women?
Pregnant women are at an increased risk of catching H1N1 or seasonal flu. Pregnant patients with H1N1 infection have an increased risk of complications. Although influenza viruses do not infect the baby while in the uterus, the high fever and any complications caused by the flu can potentially be harmful to the baby.



WHAT PRECAUTIONS CAN I TAKE TO PROTECT MYSELF AND MY UNBORN BABY?
The best way to protect yourself and your unborn baby is to have a vaccination (which is safe during pregnancy). You should also make sure you follow good hygiene practices including:

 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water. Alcohol-based gel hand cleaners are also good to use.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Talk to your doctor about your concerns.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF H1N1 INFLUENZA?
The symptoms of H1N1 flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and may include acute onset of:

  • Fever (greater than 100 F or 37.8 C)
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Stuffy nose
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with H1N1 flu.


WILL THE SYMPTOMS BE THE SAME IF I AM PREGNANT?
Yes, the symptoms of flu will be the same as in women who are not pregnant.




WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I GET SICK?
If you get sick with flu-like symptoms, stay home, limit contact with others, and call your doctor as soon as possible.

  • Treat any fever right away. Tylenol® (acetaminophen) is the best treatment of fever in pregnancy.
  • Get plenty of rest and drink clear fluids.
  • Your doctor may test you for flu or will decide if you need medications to treat the flu.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash and cleanse your hands.
  • Clean hands often with soap and water or alcohol- based hand rub.
  • Do not go to work, school, or other public places while you are ill.
  • Avoid close contact with other people.
  • Get emergency medical care right away if you have trouble breathing, chest pain, purple or blue lips or skin, severe vomiting and are dehydrated and/or dizzy, unresponsive or confused.


IS IT OK TO BREAST FEED MY BABY IF I AM SICK?

  • Do not stop breastfeeding if you are ill. This will help protect your baby from infection.
  • Be careful not to cough or sneeze in the baby’s face, wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor might ask you to wear a mask to keep from spreading this new virus to your baby.
  • If you are too sick to breastfeed, pump and have someone give the expressed milk to your baby.


IS THERE A VACCINE FOR H1N1 INFLUENZA?
Yes, an H1N1 virus vaccine is expected to be available in mid- to late October 2009. The CDC recommends this vaccine for pregnant women when it first becomes available. This vaccine has been tested in pregnant women and found to be safe and effective.


REMEMBER: The seasonal flu vaccine is not expected to protect against the H1N1 flu, therefore individuals are encouraged to get both types of vaccines.

 

 

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