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Pregnancy & H1N1 Facts for Healthcare Workers


July 10, 2013- DMC Named MOST WIRED hospital for 7th Consecutive Year
The Detroit Medical Center (DMC) has been a national leader in transforming patient care and operational efficiencies through IT innovations. These advances continue throughout the system which is why for the 7th consecutive year, DMC has been recognized as one of the nation's "Most Wired" hospitals. The results of the 2013 "Most Wired" Survey were released today in the July issue of Hospitals & Health Networks magazine. The survey awarded 289 hospitals nationwide, out of 659 hospitals and health systems that completed the survey. DMC was one of the two Detroit-based hospitals awarded among the 16 that received the award, statewide.

“DMC began its journey to national status in healthcare IT in 2006, when it was among the first systems to adopt electronic medical record (EMR), and we have achieved many new levels of connectivity since them, including electronic order entry and medication scanning,” said Joe Francis, Chief Information Officer for DMC. “Our effective use of technology has continued to improve patient care and efficiencies every day, which is especially important in this changing healthcare environment. We are very proud to have received this award again.”

Most wired hospitals have to meet specific requirements in each of four focus areas: infrastructure, business and administrative management, clinical quality and safety, and clinical integration, i.e. ambulatory, physician, patient and community.  This year two new components were added to the survey- big data analytics (a review of large amounts of data to uncover patterns and correlations) and patient generated data. Experts say big Data analytics will be essential to helping hospitals balance quality of care and cost requirements in a new environment of risk-based reimbursement and evidence-based medicine.

Hospitals & Health Networks sponsors the annual Most Wired List, which is an industry-standard benchmark study. The survey is designed to measure the level of IT adoption in U.S. hospitals and health systems, and is useful tool for hospital and health system leadership to map their IT strategic plans. Health Forum, an American Hospital Association information company, distributes, collects and analyzes the Most Wired data and develops benchmarks that are becoming the industry standard for measuring IT adoption for operational, financial and clinical performance in health care delivery systems.

“This year’s Most Wired organizations exemplify progress through innovation,” said Rich Umbdenstock, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association. “The hospital field can learn from these outstanding organizations ways that IT can help improve efficiency.”


WHAT IS H1N1 INFLUENZA?
H1N1 influenza is a respiratory disease that is caused by a type A influenza virus. The current H1N1 virus contains unique genes from pig and human influenza viruses and hence is called the “Novel H1N1 Influenza Virus”. This strain of flu germ spreads from human to human and can cause illness.



Does H1N1 INFLUENZA pose special risks for pregnant women?
Pregnant women are at an increased risk of catching H1N1 or seasonal flu. Pregnant patients with H1N1 infection have an increased risk of complications. Although influenza viruses do not infect the baby while in the uterus, the high fever and any complications caused by the flu can potentially be harmful to the baby.



WHAT PRECAUTIONS CAN I TAKE TO PROTECT MYSELF AND MY UNBORN BABY?
The best way to protect yourself and your unborn baby is to have a vaccination (which is safe during pregnancy). You should also make sure you follow good hygiene practices including:

 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water. Alcohol-based gel hand cleaners are also good to use.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Talk to your doctor about your concerns.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF H1N1 INFLUENZA?
The symptoms of H1N1 flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and may include acute onset of:

  • Fever (greater than 100 F or 37.8 C)
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Stuffy nose
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with H1N1 flu.


WILL THE SYMPTOMS BE THE SAME IF I AM PREGNANT?
Yes, the symptoms of flu will be the same as in women who are not pregnant.




WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I GET SICK?
If you get sick with flu-like symptoms, stay home, limit contact with others, and call your doctor as soon as possible.

  • Treat any fever right away. Tylenol® (acetaminophen) is the best treatment of fever in pregnancy.
  • Get plenty of rest and drink clear fluids.
  • Your doctor may test you for flu or will decide if you need medications to treat the flu.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash and cleanse your hands.
  • Clean hands often with soap and water or alcohol- based hand rub.
  • Do not go to work, school, or other public places while you are ill.
  • Avoid close contact with other people.
  • Get emergency medical care right away if you have trouble breathing, chest pain, purple or blue lips or skin, severe vomiting and are dehydrated and/or dizzy, unresponsive or confused.


IS IT OK TO BREAST FEED MY BABY IF I AM SICK?

  • Do not stop breastfeeding if you are ill. This will help protect your baby from infection.
  • Be careful not to cough or sneeze in the baby’s face, wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor might ask you to wear a mask to keep from spreading this new virus to your baby.
  • If you are too sick to breastfeed, pump and have someone give the expressed milk to your baby.


IS THERE A VACCINE FOR H1N1 INFLUENZA?
Yes, an H1N1 virus vaccine is expected to be available in mid- to late October 2009. The CDC recommends this vaccine for pregnant women when it first becomes available. This vaccine has been tested in pregnant women and found to be safe and effective.


REMEMBER: The seasonal flu vaccine is not expected to protect against the H1N1 flu, therefore individuals are encouraged to get both types of vaccines.

 

 

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