Always There.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Flikr

Pregnancy & H1N1 Facts for Healthcare Workers


Media Inquiries: Click here for contact information on the DMC Media Relations Team.

 Page 1 of 35, items 1 to 10 of 345.
Item
 Page 1 of 35, items 1 to 10 of 345.
DMC Names DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital CEO
02/17/2015
The Detroit Medical Center (DMC) has appointed Reginald J. Eadie, M.D., to serve as DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital (DRH) CEO. Dr. Eadie, a board certified emergency medicine physician and current CEO of DMC Harper-Hutzel Hospital, will assume his new, expanded role upon the retirement of Dr. Iris Taylor March 27.
Students bring the healing power of art to the new Children’s Hospital of Michigan – Troy, David K. Page Building
02/05/2015
At the Children's Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center (DMC), art is an important tool to engage and distract patients and their families and to help them cope with the stress and anxiety related to visiting the hospital. Eighteen (18) schools within Oakland and Northern Macomb Counties will be helping to create an enhanced healing environment within the new facility, with artwork. The Children’s Hospital of Michigan – Troy, David K. Page Building, located at 350 W. Big Beaver Road, is slated to open by year-end.
Pioneering Study Shows A Gene-Linked Heart Muscle Disease That Causes Sudden Cardiac Death in Children can be Ameliorated or Prevented with a New Drug Therapy
01/28/2015
A recently published study with major implications for ameliorating or preventing gene-triggered hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a chronic form of heart muscle disease characterized by abnormal thickening and enlargement of the heart muscle that may also interfere with the function of the heart, suggests that pediatric cardiologists may soon be able to use drug therapy to block the onset of these abnormalities.
DMC Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital and Commerce Elementary host
01/27/2015
The Detroit Medical Center’s (DMC) Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital (HVSH), in an effort to encourage health advocacy in local children, will partner with Commerce Elementary School to educate more than 650 children on topics ranging from physical fitness and cardiovascular health to making healthy nutrition choices.
DMC/WSU Name New Leadership in Obstetrics/Gynecology
01/21/2015
The Detroit Medical Center (DMC) and Wayne State University (WSU) announced today that Robert A. Welch, M.D., will become DMC and WSU’s vice chair of DMC Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) Clinical Operations – WSU chief and division director of Maternal Fetal Medicine, effective Feb. 1.
Breakthrough Research Finding Could Spare Kids with Bone Infections The Rigors of IV Antibiotics
01/15/2015
After reviewing the histories of more than 2,000 American children who were treated with antibiotics for bone infections, a national team of pediatric researchers has come up with a surprising finding that could change the way kids receive the drugs in the future.
New Study Publishes on Most Effective Treatment for Newborn Asphyxia Injury
01/12/2015
Led by a nationally recognized pediatric researcher at the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) and Wayne State University on the treatment of injuries caused by oxygen deprivation (“hypoxia”) during birth, a newly published study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has for the first time determined the safest temperature and duration for body-cooling (“hypothermia”) of newborns in order to minimize the injuries during the first few days of life.
DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital CEO to Retire
01/09/2015
The Detroit Medical Center (DMC) announced today that after 40 years of dedicated service, DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital CEO Iris Taylor, PhD, RN will retire, effective March 27.
Children’s Hospital of Michigan Trauma Researcher Publishes Major Study on Causes of Brain Injury in Children
01/06/2015
An exhaustive analysis of data from more than 40,000 cases of brain trauma in U.S. children – published by the authoritative New England Journal of Medicine – provides convincing evidence that protecting kids in advance from head injuries is the key to reducing their severity.
Children’s Hospital of Michigan Implements Visitation Restriction
01/05/2015
Like many hospitals throughout the Midwest, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan at the Detroit Medical Center has experienced an influx of patients with seasonal flu.
1


WHAT IS H1N1 INFLUENZA?
H1N1 influenza is a respiratory disease that is caused by a type A influenza virus. The current H1N1 virus contains unique genes from pig and human influenza viruses and hence is called the “Novel H1N1 Influenza Virus”. This strain of flu germ spreads from human to human and can cause illness.



Does H1N1 INFLUENZA pose special risks for pregnant women?
Pregnant women are at an increased risk of catching H1N1 or seasonal flu. Pregnant patients with H1N1 infection have an increased risk of complications. Although influenza viruses do not infect the baby while in the uterus, the high fever and any complications caused by the flu can potentially be harmful to the baby.



WHAT PRECAUTIONS CAN I TAKE TO PROTECT MYSELF AND MY UNBORN BABY?
The best way to protect yourself and your unborn baby is to have a vaccination (which is safe during pregnancy). You should also make sure you follow good hygiene practices including:

 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water. Alcohol-based gel hand cleaners are also good to use.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Talk to your doctor about your concerns.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF H1N1 INFLUENZA?
The symptoms of H1N1 flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and may include acute onset of:

  • Fever (greater than 100 F or 37.8 C)
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Stuffy nose
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with H1N1 flu.


WILL THE SYMPTOMS BE THE SAME IF I AM PREGNANT?
Yes, the symptoms of flu will be the same as in women who are not pregnant.




WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I GET SICK?
If you get sick with flu-like symptoms, stay home, limit contact with others, and call your doctor as soon as possible.

  • Treat any fever right away. Tylenol® (acetaminophen) is the best treatment of fever in pregnancy.
  • Get plenty of rest and drink clear fluids.
  • Your doctor may test you for flu or will decide if you need medications to treat the flu.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash and cleanse your hands.
  • Clean hands often with soap and water or alcohol- based hand rub.
  • Do not go to work, school, or other public places while you are ill.
  • Avoid close contact with other people.
  • Get emergency medical care right away if you have trouble breathing, chest pain, purple or blue lips or skin, severe vomiting and are dehydrated and/or dizzy, unresponsive or confused.


IS IT OK TO BREAST FEED MY BABY IF I AM SICK?

  • Do not stop breastfeeding if you are ill. This will help protect your baby from infection.
  • Be careful not to cough or sneeze in the baby’s face, wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor might ask you to wear a mask to keep from spreading this new virus to your baby.
  • If you are too sick to breastfeed, pump and have someone give the expressed milk to your baby.


IS THERE A VACCINE FOR H1N1 INFLUENZA?
Yes, an H1N1 virus vaccine is expected to be available in mid- to late October 2009. The CDC recommends this vaccine for pregnant women when it first becomes available. This vaccine has been tested in pregnant women and found to be safe and effective.


REMEMBER: The seasonal flu vaccine is not expected to protect against the H1N1 flu, therefore individuals are encouraged to get both types of vaccines.

 

 

find a doctor background
 Find A Doc
select
Find by Name or Specialty
select
Find by Zip Code Distance in miles
Search
About DMC
Follow Us

Search Our Site...
© 2015DMC. All Rights Reserved.