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Day 11: Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Cardiac Arrest - are they the same, or different?

 

Heart Attack, Heart Failure and Sudden Cardiac Arrest
from Detroit Medical Center on Vimeo.

What is cardiac arrest?

Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed
heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear.

Each year about 295,000 emergency medical services-treated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States.

Is a heart attack the same as cardiac arrest?

No. The term "heart attack" is often mistakenly used to describe sudden cardiac arrest. While a heart attack may cause cardiac arrest and sudden death, the terms don't mean the same thing. Heart attacks are caused by a blockage that stops blood flow to the heart. A heart attack (or myocardial infarction) refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not necessarily resulting in the death of the heart attack victim.

Cardiac arrest is caused when the heart's electrical system malfunctions. In cardiac arrest death results when the heart suddenly stops working properly. This is caused by abnormal, or irregular, heart rhythms (called
arrhythmias). The most common arrhythmia in cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation. This is when the heart's lower chambers suddenly start beating chaotically and don't pump blood. Death occurs within minutes after the heart stops. Cardiac arrest may be reversed if CPR
(cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is performed or a defibrillator is used to shock the heart and restore a normal heart rhythm within a few minutes.

Heart Failure

The term "heart failure" makes it sound like the heart is no longer working at all and there's nothing that can be done. Actually, heart failure means that the heart isn't pumping as well as it should be.

Your body depends on the heart's pumping action to deliver oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood to the body's cells. When the cells are nourished properly, the body can function normally.


With heart failure, the weakened heart can't supply the cells with enough blood . This results in fatigue and shortness of breath. Everyday activities such as walking, climbing stairs or carrying groceries can become very difficult.

Heart failure is a serious condition, and usually there's no cure. But many people with heart failure lead a full, enjoyable life when the condition is managed with heart failure medications and healthy lifestyle changes. It's also helpful to have the support of family and friends who understand your condition.


Information provided by the American Heart Association

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Syed Mahmood, M.D.

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