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Pregnancy & H1N1 Facts for Healthcare Workers


February 28, 2008- Children’s Hospital of Michigan to open specialty center in Macomb County, March 3
DETROIT -- For the first time, parents and physicians will have access to a wide variety of DMC Children’s Hospital of Michigan pediatric specialists and services in a single, pediatric-dedicated medical facility in Macomb County. Located at 42700 Garfield Road south of 19 Mile, the Stilson Specialty Center will open March 3 with nearly a dozen outpatient pediatric specialties and diagnostic testing.

“The Stilson Specialty Center is unique in that during every phase of planning, we ensured that the environment would be child and family friendly, from the interior colors to creating space for the kids-only optical shop to constructing a therapeutic rock climbing wall and even the detail of decorating the building with original art by children living in Macomb County. This pediatric outpatient center truly is just for them,” says Herman B. Gray, M.D., president, Children’s Hospital of Michigan.

A number of outpatient children’s services and pediatric specialties will open at the new 48,000 square-foot facility over the next several months, including MRI, CT Scan, X-Ray, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, a sleep lab and specialties, including gastroenterology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, general surgery, neurology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, allergy, ENT, and psychology. The site will also include a pediatric optical shop and retail pharmacy.

The Children’s Hospital of Michigan Stilson Specialty Center is a ‘first’ for both the hospital and Macomb County. The Center is the first facility that the hospital has built from the ground-up beyond the main campus in Detroit. In addition, the Stilson Specialty Center is the County’s first medical facility exclusively dedicated to pediatrics.

“Macomb County is one of the few areas in Southeast Michigan where the population of families with children is increasing. Children’s Hospital of Michigan has treated many of them for many years at our main campus in Detroit. In 2007 alone, more than 19,000 of our patients lived in Macomb County,” added Dr. Gray. “Now, we can offer convenient access to the internationally renowned physicians, nurses and other pediatric specialists that they’ve come to rely upon right in their own community.”

The Children’s Hospital of Michigan Stilson Specialty Center is expected to initially bring 50 jobs to Clinton Township and represents a $10 to $13 million investment from Children’s Hospital of Michigan to the city over the next decade.

The center is made possible in part through a significant gift from Earl Stilson, a successful Macomb County businessman. The Vietnam veteran and self-made entrepreneur is a former patient of Children’s Hospital of Michigan. He needed immediate surgery after being born with his eyes fused shut. Over the next several years, Stilson underwent multiple surgeries and rehabilitation at Children’s Hospital.

Since receiving approval for the new medical facility in July 2006, Earl Stilson and a number of community leaders, such as Macomb County Commissioner Vice President Dana Camphous-Peterson, Macomb County Sheriff Mark Hackel, Chippewa Valley Schools Superintendent Mark Deldin, and Macomb County 16th Judicial Court Judge Hon. Tracey A. Yokich have worked with Children’s Hospital President Herman Gray, MD, Board of Trustees Chair John Baker, MD, and Vice President Luanne Thomas Ewald to complete the project.

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Founded 120 years ago, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan is the first and only hospital in the state dedicated exclusively to the treatment of children. A leader internationally in neurology and neurosurgery, cardiology, oncology, and diagnostic services, it is ranked one of America’s best hospitals for children. More Michigan pediatricians are trained at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan than in any other facility. Children’s Hospital of Michigan is one of nine hospitals operated by the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). The DMC is proud to be the Official Healthcare Services Provider of the Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings, Detroit Pistons and Detroit Shock


WHAT IS H1N1 INFLUENZA?
H1N1 influenza is a respiratory disease that is caused by a type A influenza virus. The current H1N1 virus contains unique genes from pig and human influenza viruses and hence is called the “Novel H1N1 Influenza Virus”. This strain of flu germ spreads from human to human and can cause illness.



Does H1N1 INFLUENZA pose special risks for pregnant women?
Pregnant women are at an increased risk of catching H1N1 or seasonal flu. Pregnant patients with H1N1 infection have an increased risk of complications. Although influenza viruses do not infect the baby while in the uterus, the high fever and any complications caused by the flu can potentially be harmful to the baby.



WHAT PRECAUTIONS CAN I TAKE TO PROTECT MYSELF AND MY UNBORN BABY?
The best way to protect yourself and your unborn baby is to have a vaccination (which is safe during pregnancy). You should also make sure you follow good hygiene practices including:

 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water. Alcohol-based gel hand cleaners are also good to use.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Talk to your doctor about your concerns.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF H1N1 INFLUENZA?
The symptoms of H1N1 flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and may include acute onset of:

  • Fever (greater than 100 F or 37.8 C)
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Stuffy nose
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with H1N1 flu.


WILL THE SYMPTOMS BE THE SAME IF I AM PREGNANT?
Yes, the symptoms of flu will be the same as in women who are not pregnant.




WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I GET SICK?
If you get sick with flu-like symptoms, stay home, limit contact with others, and call your doctor as soon as possible.

  • Treat any fever right away. Tylenol® (acetaminophen) is the best treatment of fever in pregnancy.
  • Get plenty of rest and drink clear fluids.
  • Your doctor may test you for flu or will decide if you need medications to treat the flu.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash and cleanse your hands.
  • Clean hands often with soap and water or alcohol- based hand rub.
  • Do not go to work, school, or other public places while you are ill.
  • Avoid close contact with other people.
  • Get emergency medical care right away if you have trouble breathing, chest pain, purple or blue lips or skin, severe vomiting and are dehydrated and/or dizzy, unresponsive or confused.


IS IT OK TO BREAST FEED MY BABY IF I AM SICK?

  • Do not stop breastfeeding if you are ill. This will help protect your baby from infection.
  • Be careful not to cough or sneeze in the baby’s face, wash your hands often.
  • Your doctor might ask you to wear a mask to keep from spreading this new virus to your baby.
  • If you are too sick to breastfeed, pump and have someone give the expressed milk to your baby.


IS THERE A VACCINE FOR H1N1 INFLUENZA?
Yes, an H1N1 virus vaccine is expected to be available in mid- to late October 2009. The CDC recommends this vaccine for pregnant women when it first becomes available. This vaccine has been tested in pregnant women and found to be safe and effective.


REMEMBER: The seasonal flu vaccine is not expected to protect against the H1N1 flu, therefore individuals are encouraged to get both types of vaccines.

 

 

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